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ExpatSingapore Message Board 21 October 2014, 10:10:38 AM *
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Author Topic: Last drawn salary verification  (Read 8428 times)
oddity
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« Reply #15 on: 14 December 2002, 16:56:00 PM »
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Speaking of strange application forms, I came across one (my friend's) where they asked for you to *draw* the organisational chart of your present company (to see where you fit presumably). Can an applicant refuse on the grounds of confidentiality? it's one thing to ask in an interview, but I find that having to document it is over-stepping the boundaries!

Bizarre.

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« Reply #15 on: 14 December 2002, 16:56:00 PM »
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Wim
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« Reply #16 on: 14 December 2002, 17:36:00 PM »
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There is a good related article on this topic:

Dealing with Questions About Salary History by Michael Chaffers

QUESTION: How do I respond to the salary history question when I am currently grossly underpaid for the work that I do, and I am trying to correct that as I interview for new jobs?
ANSWER:Your best strategy is to keep them focused on what is an appropriate amount for you to make given your experience, skills and credentials today. This requires some homework, since you have to translate those intangibles into a dollar figure or a range of figures. In addition, be prepared to explain why you are seeking a significant jump in your salary and be ready to help the employer justify paying you this increased amount -- those people do not want to feel as if they are overpaying you. You could try saying, "I chose to work at my last job for less than my market value for very specific reasons (e.g., gain experience, restart career, they had money problems). Now that I have benefited from experience, as I look for a new employer, I want to make sure that I am being paid fairly for my talents."
As you follow this advice, do not forget that you have to be prepared to discuss your current salary, even though it ought to be irrelevant. If that information matters to the employer, they will either insist on talking about it, or they will learn it another way. Try to cover the issue quickly and steer the conversation back to its rightful place -- what you ought to make, given the value of your talents in the market.

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good advice
Guest
« Reply #17 on: 14 December 2002, 19:15:00 PM »
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but I personally find it tough to do! I'm lousy at salary negotiations.... I always wonder how people manage to get a big jump in salary - like 30% or something. I'm happy just to get like a 5% raise. :-(

The way I see this istuation is that they're asking for all this because that's what they do all the time... it's HR practice. And locals will just follow because -- well, they won't question it. Like the application forms here - I'm sure those forms have been around for "donkey years" and nobody bothers to remove questions but just adds to them! And people applyinh for jobs won't do anything to jeopardise their chances.

Since you're working for an American boss and are not local, maybe you can get away with refusing to provide the sllip......

Just my 2 cents.


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good advice?
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« Reply #18 on: 14 December 2002, 21:26:00 PM »
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What utter bull. No wonder you managed only a 5% raise.

And you're actually prepared to hop for that meagre amount??

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good advice
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« Reply #19 on: 14 December 2002, 21:49:00 PM »
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duh- i mean good advice from the previous poster about salary negotiations. Feh.
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localer
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« Reply #20 on: 15 December 2002, 21:24:00 PM »
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good advice,

don't be stupid. sure, these forms have been around for donkeys' years, but so have foreigner workers. if they were so outspoken and against the system, they would have kicked up a big fuss long back.

don't just blame it on the unquestioning locals.

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Salary is confidential
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« Reply #21 on: 16 December 2002, 15:44:00 PM »
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You can approach this issue by saying that your current company considers salary to be confidential and that you cannot reveal it. After all, your new company wouldn't want you to reveal their confidential information.
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CK
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« Reply #22 on: 16 December 2002, 17:30:00 PM »
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Good advice.... If you want to do better stop offering your 2 cents worth....... and saying something like ..."just my 2 grand..". Get in the right frame and things will happen for you.

As to the original poster I cannot believe the majority of people here saying negative things. What a bunch of jealous losers. Just tell them the company never provided pay slips they will not care. In any case 52K and 5200 p.m aint a criminal lie anyway. When I was a young tucker I was on 65K lied to say I was on 80 to get 85K and the company folded 3 months later. I then lied and said I was on 110K and had it matched by the new employer. ie 65K to 110K within 10 weeks   Yeah baby. You only live this life once do what you can to get ahead. Especially when we all know you work hard enough to justify this money!

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localer
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« Reply #23 on: 16 December 2002, 19:36:00 PM »
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that's how we end up having expats of dubious quality which i've been questioning...

and cactus has been trying to silence me...

hmm...

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Busted
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« Reply #24 on: 16 December 2002, 21:13:00 PM »
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It's like lying about your O levels.  At interview you say you got 9 O levels, but when d-day comes you only have certs for 7 of them ... hmmm.  What's the difference,  you lied about your salary and you've been busted.  You can run but you can't hide. No sympathy.
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Salary is Confidential
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« Reply #25 on: 16 December 2002, 22:07:00 PM »
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To Busted

I think there is a big difference between fibbing on your academic qualifications and your last salary.

Without going into a discussion of whether academic performance is an indicator for job performance, it is generally accepted to be one indicator.  Furthermore, academic qualifcations are not confidential, and a prerequisite for getting certain positions.


Salary should be based on the job, your qualification/experience for that job, and demand & supply for that job. Your last drawn salary should have no impact on your new salary. And as I said, salary information is in general confidential.

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Busted
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« Reply #26 on: 17 December 2002, 0:08:00 AM »
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At the end of the day it all boils down to what your own standards and level of integrity are.  Presumably a higher leaving salary was quoted to entice a higher starting salary. Your call where you draw the line.

I can tell you I wouldn't hire this person if they didn't pass the pre-employment checks.

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