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Author Topic: Mould on furniture  (Read 4882 times)
Connie
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« on: 19 February 2001, 8:55:00 AM »
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I've just noticed mould starting to grow on the outside of my furniture. This seems to be restricted to unvarnished teak. I can obviously wipe it off, but does anyone have any suggestions to prevent it re-occurring?
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Paul N
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« Reply #1 on: 19 February 2001, 9:14:00 AM »
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I have been oiling my teak like the dickens.  I was told by a very good woodworker to finish teak with teak oil, like this.

One coat a day for a week, one coat a week for a month, and one coat a month for a year, then one coat a year for life.  I have to say, my teak is absolutely amazing looking now.  The wood is starting to take on a translucent appearance.  It looks like you could stick your finger in and touch the grain.

As for mould, it when it's well oiled, the mould won't touch it!

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BoardManager
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« Reply #2 on: 19 February 2001, 11:21:00 AM »
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Umm, Paul, this exercise sounds very serious:
1. One coat of oil a day for a week - I only wash the car once a week, and it costs so much more.

2. Then one coat of oil a week for a month - I am left with only three weeks for that month.

3. Then one coat of oil a month for a year - gosh! I am left with 11 months of the year to enjoy whatever else I am supposed to be doing.

4. And the last - one coat a year for life! this sure won't work for me : I lose one year of my life to keep fungus off the teak furniture! Besides, what does one do if there is more than one piece of teak furniture?  

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Paul N
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« Reply #3 on: 19 February 2001, 11:39:00 AM »
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I am oiling 17 pieces of teak a day and I am only spending just over an hour to do it.  I use a spray bottle to apply the oil, then let it sit until I have finished spraying the last piece.  I then go back to the first piece and rub it in.  By the time I am to the last piece, it is ready and the whole thing goes very quickly.

Just a word of note...clean your sprayer with hot water or spirits or the nozzle will clog after the second day.

BM, you really need to take a course in time managment.  If you didn't spend so much time surfing around this board, you would have time to take care of your furniture!!!  

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PhilM
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« Reply #4 on: 19 February 2001, 12:08:00 PM »
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BM don't let Paul con you, he did nothing to his teak furniture for nearly two years and is now  oiling furiously to his Fathers's instructions. Seems Dad told him correctly that his teak furniture would crack in Idaho if not well oiled. So there you have it now the furniture is like Paul - Well Oiled!
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To Paul N
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« Reply #5 on: 19 February 2001, 12:24:00 PM »
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Will you put an extra coat of oil on your 17 pieces of teak so that they don't dry out after packing?
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BoardManager
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« Reply #6 on: 19 February 2001, 12:35:00 PM »
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My mother tells me, to this day, that whatever my hands find to do, do it to the best of my effort (not ability). So I will never take short cuts like you do, Paul; I will diligently oil one piece a day. So 17 pieces, 17 days! That's the way to good old hard work.

Then when I was in Uni, the lecturers tell me that if I want to succeed, I must have Excellence in all I do. So it has been one essay at a time, never 17 pieces in a go. I made it through the Uni. But have not succeeded. I think there were several more golden rules these selfish buggers never told us.

And then when I started working for some MNCs, they taught us that the best things in life must be cultivated. Take a long term view, do not be tempted to go for short term gains. Do not compromise quality for quantity. So I never did 17 items of work targets in a go; always faithfully sticking by the advice of the important people in my life.

I have not yet mentioned what my wife has been telling. Either she is not as important or I cannot repeat what the instructions were/are. Or they have never worked.

Well, Phil, I agree with you. Having been on this Board for so long, I know when not to be taken in by Paul. He has been oiling the 17 pieces of unsold furniture with teak oil, and only once, regardless of whether they are teak wood or not, so he does not have to lug them back to Idaho, Montana, to  place potatoes on them  

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Paul N
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« Reply #7 on: 19 February 2001, 13:53:00 PM »
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So BM, what you're saying is one can only accomplish one task per day?  That being the argument, how do you make it to work in the morning, as you should have used up all your day's energy by merely getting out of bed in the morning?  As for quality of effort, come on over and I'll do 16 pieces my way, and you can do one your way, and at the end of one year, we'll compare whose looks better, then we'll compare again in 50 years after mine has had 50 more coats of oil, and see how they've fared.

I was raised under a man who was very conscious of wasted effort.  Never waste motion.  If you can accomplish in one movement what takes others two, you are conserving that most valuable commodity of all...time.  Time not spent laboriously grinding away at the grain with a thimbleful of oil preserves that much more time that you can spend fruitfully with animate objects whose returns are much more meaningful than a glowing piece of wood.  

If that's the case, and I really only needed to apply one coat of teak oil, will you be reimbursing me for the 5.5 liters of oil I have used but didn't really need?  Oh, and how will you be replacing the 4-5 hours of my life that I wasted???  

[This message has been edited by Paul N (edited 19-02-2001).]

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PhilM
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« Reply #8 on: 19 February 2001, 14:16:00 PM »
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Paul remember the maxim our Board Manager, lives by:-

"If you can get someone else to do it great! if not put off the task until you can".

Sound familiar?

[This message has been edited by PhilM (edited 19-02-2001).]

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Paul N
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« Reply #9 on: 19 February 2001, 14:25:00 PM »
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Paul N
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« Reply #10 on: 20 February 2001, 16:28:00 PM »
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Just finished coat 5 of the first 7.  Took 1 hour 7 minutes.  Teak is starting to glow as if it is translucent.

I was talking to the proprietor of the Art & Teak shop on Bedok N. St. 4 and he was concerned that I was using Indonesian teak oil.  I told him I was using Colrun teak oil from Sheffield.  He warned me that Indonesian teak oil is of lower grade and to avoid it.  Boy, do I now know why.

Indonesian teak oil doesn't seem to soak in well.  It sits on the surface and becomes this ruddy brown sticky mess.  When I put the Colbar on it, the spirits dissolved the Indonesian garbage and gummed up two towels while I was trying to get it rubbed off.

When we bought several of these pieces, they were kind of a dark ruddy brown.  Now that they have been cleaned up and well oiled, they are gorgeous.  I am actually stunned at how pretty a buffet that we were going to just use as an outdoor patio piece, turned out.  Now we have decided it will be a showpiece in our newly teak-oriented formal living room.

BM, I missed you this afternoon...weren't you going to come over and do that one piece for me?  

Oh, wait, I forgot, you already got out of bed today...sorry!              

[This message has been edited by Paul N (edited 20-02-2001).]

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Angel#1
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« Reply #11 on: 21 February 2001, 14:51:00 PM »
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Paul

Is your teak the really dark brown stuff or that golden couloured stuff?  we have the golden (think BayWatch tan colour) version in our furniture and it's got a very matt finish, not shiny or oiled or waxed or varnished.  just kind of natural!  though i suspect it was oiled at some time.  

what are your carpenter's advice for us to keep it looking mint and being able to travel back to NZ without a hitch in years tot come?

also, in the centre of the dining table i stupidly lit a blue candle which then leaked wax onto the wood.  Very Homer Simpson.  We have a lovely blueish tinged stain there now, how can i get rid of this without drawing more attention to it, and redeem myself in the eyes of my husband??

thanks!

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Paul N
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« Reply #12 on: 21 February 2001, 15:49:00 PM »
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Most all of my teak is Baywatch bronze.  A couple of the pieces started out that ruddy brown color, but after several coats of this teak oil, it has lightened to the Baywatch bronze.  

As I mentioned before, the Indonesian teak oil tends to not be thinned well, and sits on the surface of the wood, covering it with a topical dressing if you will.  When you apply an oil containing a significant amount of thinner, the old oil dissolves and is wiped away.  The first couple of coats you apply will dirty your wiping rags terribly, so be prepared with a good quantity of rags.

As I mentioned above, one a day for a week, one a week for a month and one a month for a year, and one a year for life.  I know it's labor intensive for the first month/year, but the wood will become bulletproof by the end of the first year.  My Dad has a cherrywood riflestock he finished this way in 1950 or so, and it has been drug through the mountains of Montana yearly since then and still looks as though it was just finished yesterday.

On the topic of stains, I was in Homestore DIY in Eastpoint mall the other day and noticed they carry Formby's Furniture Refinisher.  Formby's also makes a stain remover which, I believe, contains a light bleaching component.  You may want to try that and see how it works.  Barring success there, you can always sand the surface with finer grit paper starting with 125 and moving progressively to 400, then refinish the entire tabletop.  You will want to sand the entire top equally, else you may find a distinct color difference near the area with new wood exposed following the sanding.

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fabulous
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« Reply #13 on: 22 February 2001, 1:30:00 AM »
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gee, Paul N, you sure do take your teak seriously! Very admirable. Please share with us places to buy good teak furniture and that Colrun oil.

Any recommendations/comments on rosewood furniture?

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Paul N
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« Reply #14 on: 22 February 2001, 7:40:00 AM »
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I have bought some stuff at Vintage Palace on Dempsey Rd.  It varies in quality drastically.  Look for good fit and a Baywatch Bronze color rather than the ruddy brown.

I just bought a bar cabinet at Art & Teak, BLK 3016, Bedok North Ave. 4 #01-17, from Richard Yeo.  He's become my new source of information on well-made teak.  This cabinet has great fit and finish, and is built with details like drawer slides and recessed hinges.  It is obvious that their manufacturer has a bunch of good cabinet-making power equipment, as once you notice the difference it screams in your face when you see it.

As for rosewood, that's Phil M's specialty.

Colrun Teak Oil is available at Home-Fix DIY stores.  $20 for 500ml tin.

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