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ExpatSingapore Message Board 31 October 2014, 22:06:49 PM *
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Author Topic: buying fish at the wet market  (Read 7171 times)
sarasponda
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« on: 23 April 2008, 19:57:56 PM »
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I'm looking for some non-smelly fish to serve the family at dinner every day. Any recommendations for non-smelly fish (with local names, if possible, since I can't recognise one kind from the other)
Many thanks in advance.
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« on: 23 April 2008, 19:57:56 PM »
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cod
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« Reply #1 on: 23 April 2008, 20:27:48 PM »
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If it is 'smelly' it is not fresh - no matter what the name, don't buy it.  fresh fish should smell of the sea and the eyes should be bright, not cloudy.  Anything else is cr@p - don't buy it.

In saying the above, I have always been lucky enough to buy great fish from the wet market - won't touch the chicken though Wink
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fisherman
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« Reply #2 on: 23 April 2008, 21:58:22 PM »
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OP,I take it by 'smelly' fish you mean fish that doesnt have a very fishy smell?  I dont like the smell of fish either. I buy seabass, it isnt an overbearing fish and the smell is bearable.  Seabass is very common.  On the other hand, dont buy pomfret as it stinks!
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stevec
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« Reply #3 on: 23 April 2008, 23:14:20 PM »
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Agree with previous poster on the smell issue. Fresh will not have much of a smell other than the sea.  The issue that most people face is that it is the wet market itself that smells and this can put people off.

I have been buying fish from the markets here for many years and it is great value and really fresh.  So my suggestions is as follows

1. Buffalo market is one of the best markets in town and the cheapest.  Do not go on a monday however as the ships are not working

2. Good fish to buy are Red snapper (very firm flesh so can be BBQ, or grilled or panfried), Sole(excellent white fish for fish pies, fish cakes etc), tengirri/spanish mackerel(big fish looks liek a huge mackerel, really good in curries or baked). sting ray(excellent BBQ with some sambal in a banana leaf). tioman(white fish very good for deep frying).

All of these fish will be known by there english names to the guys at tekka market.

3. Prawns are also very good value here as are the slipper lobster(sensational on the BBQ)

Hope this helps.  post back if you have any issues.

Also the guys in the market will fillet the fish for with or without skin.  they will usually offer the bones as well in case you want to make stock
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sarasponda
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« Reply #4 on: 24 April 2008, 10:19:05 AM »
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 Yes, I had meant fish that don't have a fishy smell.. I had bought pomfret - the white one - a couple of days ago and followed a simple recipe, but it stank no end and hence my post... Have recipes for all the names suggested in your posts, will keep trying. Thanks a ton for your suggestions!
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codpiece
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« Reply #5 on: 24 April 2008, 17:43:34 PM »
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Hi,
I like the 'cod fish' which I think is black cod, not like the north atlantic cod.  It is firm, white flesh, great for fish curries, frying etc. I know what you mean about the smell of fish. I'm the same as you, I don't like strong flavours ie red snapper etc.  Always buy a fish with clear looking eyes and look under the gill flaps, the gills should be a bright red colour, indicating freshness. The fresher the less likely the fish will smell.Good luck
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Spot!
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« Reply #6 on: 24 April 2008, 22:43:36 PM »
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I am not a big fish eater and don't know much about fish.

Whenever I want a a particular type of fish (eg for BBQ/steaming) I ask the fishmonger at the wet market I go to and I haven't had a problem with his suggestions yet.

Do look at the fish and see if the eyes are clear, no bad smell, etc as someone posted earlier.
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Sakana Aniki
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« Reply #7 on: 25 April 2008, 0:13:51 AM »
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OP, seriously, I think you got a "bad" white pomfret. No joking. I have never had any issue with white promfret and actually they are really good if you steam them with some ginger. Make sure you check the gill if it is red. If black or white/pale, then maybe it's been frozen for months. You could have gotten one of those.

One tip: go for a smaller fishmonger (normally you will find 2, 3 in a wet market) as they generally have less variety but sell mostly fresh catch of the day. Watch out for those stalls which have lots of "Offers"  Wink
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hibiscus24
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« Reply #8 on: 06 May 2008, 16:10:08 PM »
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Two non-smelly varieties of fish I've tried are Toman and Dorab (Parang). Dorab is tasty but has many long, firm bones. They're easy to remove. Toman is a nice alternative to salmon if you want to bake or pan-fry. Another, that I liked grilled whole or in a curry, is leatherjacket. Delicate flesh. I get these at the Carrefour fish section, though. From the wet market I buy Batang (very nice) or Pomfret. The Batang is best bought from the wet market as it will be fresher than that in the supermarket. I think that's the one used in fish soup and porridge.
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