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ExpatSingapore Message Board 22 October 2017, 17:51:19 PM *
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Author Topic: Australian Common Law Spouse / De facto  (Read 7098 times)
common-law wife
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« on: 20 November 2008, 11:45:28 AM »
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I am moving to Singapore with my partner soon (he will be on a EP), we will apply for a Long Term Social Visitor Pass for myself when we get there.

As per the MOM website to apply for a Long Term Social Visitor Pass for a Common Law Spouse, we need a “A letter from the EP holder's embassy confirming the status of his/her common-law marriage to the applicant in their country”.

He was in Singapore recently, and called the Australian embassy there to ensure we could get a statutory declaration letter to prove our ‘common-law marriage’.  We would provide evidence via bank statements, joint property ownership etc.  They told him they no longer issue these letters and to contact MOM!

My question is, have any other Australians been to the Embassy in Singapore recently and got a statutory declaration letter?

We are unable to get it done in Australia before we leave.  If the Embassy in Singapore refuses to give us a letter when we’re there, we’ll go to KL or Bangkok to get it done I guess.
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newlocal
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« Reply #1 on: 20 November 2008, 23:57:14 PM »
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I suggest your boyfriend to call them up again and talk to a different person. 

There is a lot of confusion around this topic.  It's not "a letter" from the embassy which helps you support/prove your relationship.  They will not look at all your evidence and help endorse in a letter that you are telling the truth. 

What is required is a simple statutory declaration, written by your boyfriend on their statutory declaration form.  They simply stamp it (like a witness).  Then you submit to your boyfriend's employer and ask them to help you apply for this.

So just double check that your boyfriend was asking them if he could come and get their stamp on his statutory declaration. 

They might have said the typical "No, cannot lah" (it often pops out prematurely) just because they heard the intention (get an unmarried person recognized to stay in their country) and thought that they had to be the ones writing the letter, rather than the actual task required of stamping a very standard form.

Good luck
« Last Edit: 21 November 2008, 0:05:33 AM by newlocal » Logged
Art
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« Reply #2 on: 14 December 2008, 13:59:22 PM »
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I second that. I came here from the US on a work visa with my girlfriend who's unemployed. To get her a SVP, all we had to do, fill out the "common law" application, bring it to a lawyer ($40) for a signature and pass it over to my HR. They got her card within a few days. No embassy envolved.
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been there done that
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« Reply #3 on: 15 December 2008, 18:33:03 PM »
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Too bad that someone with PR cannot get this done, while someone on EP can.

Inconsistent rules ?
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EJ
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« Reply #4 on: 09 January 2009, 17:13:01 PM »
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I've searched MOM web for "statutory declaration form" or "common law form" but didn't find any. Is that something that I need to obtain from MOM office in Singapore or from any law office? Thank you.
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newlocal
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« Reply #5 on: 01 February 2009, 1:06:54 AM »
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A statutory declaration form should be available at your Embassy (not at MOM / website).  You can declare absolutely anything you want on such a form.  Then the embassy officer should stamp/witness your declaration. 

I have used this method to declare defacto status, and to provide legal "proof of address".
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ScottD
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« Reply #6 on: 07 June 2013, 15:17:00 PM »
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hey do you have an example of what the stat dec should say? does it need to be detailed or simply state you are in a common law arragement with your partner?

Thanks,

Scott
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Bloka
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« Reply #7 on: 07 June 2013, 19:48:00 PM »
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Just has to state you are in a common law marriage.

No proof required. Download the stat dec form from the web (Oz site), fill it in, get it signed and away you go. It's that simple.
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newlocal
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« Reply #8 on: 07 June 2013, 21:28:00 PM »
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Agree

I simply wrote my full name and partner's full name:

"I declare that I, ______, (Passport number____, nationality) am in a defacto relationship with _____ (Passport number, nationality).  We have lived together since ______ in _____(countries).  Our relationship is committed and I consider her/him to be my common law spouse."

[If you have other details of your commitment to each other, by all means state that too....but it's not mandatory.  I wrote about the fact we held a shared bank account and a mortgage for example.]
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ruth1234
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« Reply #9 on: 21 July 2017, 12:45:35 PM »
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Was this Declaration signed/stamped by a lawyer in Singapore or the home country? I am currently trying to get a LTVP based on my partner's EP and we are both Irish. Irish Embassy not providing much information.
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M.Watson
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« Reply #10 on: 29 September 2017, 12:49:21 PM »
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We just got my LTVP approved and I was listed as a common-law spouse.
We used the de facto letter from the Australia Embassy available at the link below:

smartraveller.gov.au/services/legalising-documents/documents/de-facto-relationship-letter.pdf

And we prepared a Statutory Declaration (available on link below) and made note of how long we had been together, the places we had lived together, what accounts and things we had in joint names and then had it signed by an authorised notary.

ag.gov.au/Publications/Statutory-declarations/Documents/CommonwealthStatutorydeclarationform.pdf

Good Luck!
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