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ExpatSingapore Message Board 23 September 2018, 3:02:21 AM *
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Author Topic: What does 'light cooking' mean?  (Read 12906 times)
flea
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« on: 09 November 2009, 12:32:58 PM »
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Hi,

Going through shared accommodation ads at the moment and I keep coming across the term 'light cooking'. Does anyone know what this means? Toasted sandwich? TV Dinner in the microwave?

Or, more importantly, what does it exclude? No home made fish head curry? Garlic Prawns are out?

Thanks in advance,

Flea
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once upon a cheater.
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« Reply #1 on: 09 November 2009, 13:45:46 PM »
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no huge 'set the smoke alarms' going type of deep-fried smoke-out cooking maybe?
and pungent smells?

quick-fix sandwiches and salads (are these things even considered cooking?)
and stuff like light soups, instant-noodles type cooking ok lah.

fish curry doesn't require all that much, except for the early fried shallots and curry bit.
but if you take the shortcut, and dump in everything together to simmer .. it's like a stew really, so maybe also ok?
it's probably only the ensuing smell that will be the issue.

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notsure
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« Reply #2 on: 09 November 2009, 15:05:06 PM »
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I would imagine that it means there's no oven (which is quite common here) and maybe they have just an electric hob.
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dohdih
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« Reply #3 on: 09 November 2009, 19:31:48 PM »
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THis rule doesn't apply at all if one is renting the WHOLE apartment.
Who the hell knows how heavy cooking one does, so long you clean up properly!!

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Meaning
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« Reply #4 on: 09 November 2009, 22:18:09 PM »
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Only a Singaporean would stipulate "light cooking" for those renting a room.  They are afraid that the person will create a major mess in the kitchen or leave dirty dishes overnight.
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Laughter
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« Reply #5 on: 10 November 2009, 1:31:42 AM »
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I love how people here think it is acceptable to dictate people's lives in this way. "Only light cooking in the home you pay to live in!" How laughable.
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hullo, wake up pps
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« Reply #6 on: 10 November 2009, 6:07:41 AM »
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And hence a harmless question like this came bring out come the negative naysayers about this is "uniquely Singapore" only.
Gimme a break.


As a student who had rented for 6 years abroad (yes, the West, no less!) before buying, I have come across landlords the world over(NOT any particular race either) who have specifed <light cooking> only.

Hence provision of only a microwave and/or toaster over, and/or hotplate.
They are expecting you to room only mostly (and be out for the rest of the day), an upfront already will ask about your lifestyle habits before deciding on prospective tenants.

Or <NO cooking> at all.
Esp if you only have a room in a shared space.

It's not all that different from specifications like <No pets> and <No smokers> really.
Yes maybe discrimatory, but these DO exist in Canada BC, and USA.
Just check the rental ads in general.
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flea
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« Reply #7 on: 10 November 2009, 6:22:21 AM »
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Only a Singaporean would stipulate "light cooking" for those renting a room.  They are afraid that the person will create a major mess in the kitchen or leave dirty dishes overnight.

There are probably other countries where they stipulate 'light cooking', I don't know. However, that was not my question.

If someone stipulates 'No pork' because they are Muslim, I understand. It's specific. The problem with the term 'light cooking', is that I am not sure what it means exactly.

The replies here have been helpful. If it simply means 'no oven' then I can still stir-fry. If it means 'no strong smells' or 'no stir fry' or something along those lines, then I will need to change my cooking habits, or eat out a lot!

Thanks to all those who replied with helpful information.
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flea
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« Reply #8 on: 10 November 2009, 6:27:18 AM »
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It's not all that different from specifications like <No pets> and <No smokers> really.
Yes maybe discrimatory, but these DO exist in Canada BC, and USA.
Just check the rental ads in general.

Except that that there is no ambiguity in statements like <No pets> or <No smokers>. I don't have any problem at all with someone stipulating <Light Cooking>, I would just like to know what that means.

Hence provision of only a microwave and/or toaster over, and/or hotplate.
So it really refers to the cooking facilities available rather than the type of food you are allowed to cook?

Thanks for your reply.
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Why not ask
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« Reply #9 on: 10 November 2009, 8:28:08 AM »
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the person who is advertising as it does seem ambiguous
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Charming
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« Reply #10 on: 10 November 2009, 8:51:46 AM »
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You see, Flea, saying thank you wasn't so hard after all  Wink
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not heavy
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« Reply #11 on: 10 November 2009, 9:24:17 AM »
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I think "once upon a cheater" got it right. Light cooking means just what it says - no heavy cooking. No pungent smell such as cooking belachan. No deep frying that smokes out the whole house. No strong curry that permeates to your neighbours. In short, considerate cooking.  Soup, instant noodles, rice, microwave etc.
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flea
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« Reply #12 on: 10 November 2009, 9:53:18 AM »
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You see, Flea, saying thank you wasn't so hard after all  Wink

Thanks to all those who replied with helpful information.
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flea
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« Reply #13 on: 10 November 2009, 9:57:40 AM »
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I think "once upon a cheater" got it right. Light cooking means just what it says - no heavy cooking. No pungent smell such as cooking belachan. No deep frying that smokes out the whole house. No strong curry that permeates to your neighbours. In short, considerate cooking.  Soup, instant noodles, rice, microwave etc.

Sounds plausible. I wonder if the term is completely subjective. For instance, 1 person may not like the smell of cheese, but could be fine with curry. Another person may hate the smell of Chinese herbal soup, but be fine with garlic.

At any rate, I mostly cook stir-fries and curries, so I might need to eat those things outside and stick to toasted sandwiches and sushi at home.  Smiley I wonder if there is a problem with making fruit smoothies with my blender in the morning  Shocked lol

Lot to find out, lot to learn.
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Cooking schmooking
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« Reply #14 on: 10 November 2009, 10:23:28 AM »
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Let's just list all the foods you cook and eat. Give us the recipes for your curries and stir fry secrets so we can all figure out if you are eligible to move in the little shared flat you desire.

I have an idea, don't bother anymore, you are obnoxious!
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