Skip to content

ExpatSingapore

Home Message Board Contact Us Search

ExpatSingapore Message Board 24 April 2014, 18:07:18 PM *
Username: Password: (or Register)
 
Pages: [1] 2
  Reply  |  Print  
Author Topic: Employment pass rejected more than once  (Read 9586 times)
tropics_oz
Newbie
*
Posts: 2


View Profile
« on: 07 September 2011, 19:50:41 PM »
Reply with quoteQuote

Hey guys, just looking for a bit of advice if anyone has been through a similar situation:

Moved to SG almost a year ago for defacto partner's transfer, all very exciting to be expats again and experiencing life in Asia.  Partner is on a P1 pass and I hold a LTVP as his common law spouse.

I am a recent graduate (end of last year) from a reputable uni back home and was quickly offered a job with a local company based on my education - a degree which is very specific to the role and not offered in Singapore.  Jobs in my area are fairly limited in Singapore as it is an emerging field, and the skills required for the role were very specific.

Initial application for a Q1 pass was turned down, along with three other applications and appeals done over the course of this year.  Extremely frustrated as MoM do not give reasons behind their decision making process and rejection. 

The company that has offered me the job have been fantastic and supportive during this whole process, but have now admitted there is nothing more they can do.  The job was re-advertised and no local applicants fit the skill-set required, however MoM still do not see that I am not only ready and willing to work, but also qualified for the position. 

I realise that my lack of experience does not help my case, but does anyone have any advice or tips on what to do next?  Is it likely that the high number of rejections will have an affect on any positions/EP applications I go for in the future?

Any help will be much appreciated as we are getting desperate and may have to consider leaving Singapore if I am unable to work.

Cheers.
Logged
ExpatSingapore Message Board
« on: 07 September 2011, 19:50:41 PM »
Reply with quoteQuote



 Logged
sorrytohear
Guest
« Reply #1 on: 07 September 2011, 22:08:15 PM »
Reply with quoteQuote

Don't have a solution, just wanted to say sorry. I recently had an application to set up my own company rejected. If I cannot work here, then I see no future for myself in Singapore. I can't live here for the rest of my life not working. We have decided to move back home, not because of this, but the fact that I cannot earn here is one of the main reasons why I personally want to leave.
Logged
$ Problem
Guest
« Reply #2 on: 07 September 2011, 22:53:55 PM »
Reply with quoteQuote

Q1?  Why noy P2?  Is it because they aren't paying you the min salary required for a P2?  Generally, the higher the job's pay, the higher the chance of EP approval.
Logged
tropics_oz
Newbie
*
Posts: 2


View Profile
« Reply #3 on: 08 September 2011, 9:52:07 AM »
Reply with quoteQuote

The salary offered fit the range for a Q1 pass...I think that raising it to a P2 pass for an applicant with little experience may be pushing it!  (but thanks for the advice)
Logged
$ Problem
Guest
« Reply #4 on: 08 September 2011, 13:08:04 PM »
Reply with quoteQuote

The min salary for a P2 is SGD4500/mth.  Yes, that is high for a recent (or, in Singapore speak, "fresh") BA/BS graduate.  But, if they want you bad enough and can't find anyone in SG to do the job...?
Logged
Company
Guest
« Reply #5 on: 08 September 2011, 16:14:55 PM »
Reply with quoteQuote

What about your spouse setting up a company with you as a co director then your "employer" engaging the company to provide consultancy services.  Once the company is earning sufficient funds it can apply for a pass for you.
Logged
Martha Beck
Guest
« Reply #6 on: 04 October 2011, 17:22:01 PM »
Reply with quoteQuote

I am also going through the same situation from past 6 months. I have gone through posts from the government in the internet stating that they will give preference to the local ones but they really don't realize that locals don't have degrees. While the foreigners have worked hard for the degrees. They wanted us till they could develop their country. Its shitting, lets wait till the country face economic crises and start hiring foreign talent. As for me, I am going back because I can't stay in a country where people are cowards and are scared of competing with foreign talents. Wish luck to others.
Logged
touchring
Guest
« Reply #7 on: 05 October 2011, 13:43:10 PM »
Reply with quoteQuote

I am also going through the same situation from past 6 months. I have gone through posts from the government in the internet stating that they will give preference to the local ones but they really don't realize that locals don't have degrees. While the foreigners have worked hard for the degrees. They wanted us till they could develop their country. Its shitting, lets wait till the country face economic crises and start hiring foreign talent. As for me, I am going back because I can't stay in a country where people are cowards and are scared of competing with foreign talents. Wish luck to others.


I've heard people having their work permit canceled after working in Singapore for 2 years and forced to leave.  With economic crisis, the government will force foreigners to leave so that locals can take over their jobs.  Experience can be learned on the job, not a problem.
Logged
tell the truth
Guest
« Reply #8 on: 05 October 2011, 16:04:31 PM »
Reply with quoteQuote

As for me, I am going back because I can't stay in a country where people are cowards and are scared of competing with foreign talents. Wish luck to others.

You're going back because you're not the best option for employers.  Not because you're so good you scare people.
Logged
Addadude
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 431



View Profile WWW
« Reply #9 on: 05 October 2011, 18:37:28 PM »
Reply with quoteQuote

Tropics_Oz, the only advice I have is based on a similar situation I encountered back 1997, so it may not be pertinent today. (No harm trying it though.)

I had a prospective employee at the time who, although he had been previously been a Singapore EP holder, had his EP application to work in my organisation rejected. We appealed and it was rejected again. Because this employee would have been a valuable addition to the company (and because I wanted to help him out of a tricky situation) I went down to Immigration with my head of HR and asked very politely to speak somebody about it.

The officer we spoke to was at first rather bureaucratic, saying that they were not obliged to provide an explanation. I explained that I wasn't challenging their decision, but merely seeking clarification - as this potential employee appeared to fulfill all the criteria for an EP holder and, in case we were to apply for an EP for somebody else, I wanted to make sure we hadn't missed anything. This appeared to mollify him and he looked through the original application.

Upon looking at it, he agreed that my the guy we wanted to hire did indeed meet their criteria. He then said he would resubmit the application - and that the following week he would be involved in the committee that reviews these applications, so there shouldn't be a problem! Sure enough, the following week my employee's application was approved.

It really was as arbitrary as that!

So, perhaps you can ask your potential employer to try this.
Logged
Martha Beck
Guest
« Reply #10 on: 06 October 2011, 15:55:33 PM »
Reply with quoteQuote

@tell the truth :

 I am sure you are a Singaporean  enjoying every facility that the government is providing you. But still for your information I got selected in a government firm in Singapore. My interviewer was very happy with my skill sets and he himself said that it was difficult to find a person with good knowledge on the domain. For your information this was my first interview at Singapore and I got through it. They waited for me for about 2 months. You known probably you can't clear that much also that's why you are seeking government help rather competing with foreigners.

  @Addadude  :
  MOM didn't even cared to give the reason for rejecting the appeal also. Which they use to do earlier. They are really blunt from past few months. I personally went to MOM asking for the reason but they said "we are front desk admins we don't know why EP got rejected and can't help you and you will have to leave Singapore".


@touchring :
If people have degree and can compete then they should be given a fair chance. If local people have talent and degree then they can take over jobs no one would complain. But if they ask us to go away and ask government to reserve jobs for them even if they don't have the degree, its really not done. 

I am just quoting you an example which I came to know from a friend.
A man who was working in a company as a junior analysts (he had just a year experience) is now working in a well known firm as a project manager. Just because the position was open to local.. Lucky guy. But think is it wise and beneficial for the firm in long term??? just be true to yourself
Logged
counter view
Guest
« Reply #11 on: 06 October 2011, 18:50:51 PM »
Reply with quoteQuote

however...

it makes economic sense to bring in foreign talent such as myself for the more highly paid jobs in order to create skills transfers and moving sg up the value chain. hiring a person who has unique skills of relatively low market value (per your admission) makes little economic sense to singapore.

your prospective employer doesnt value these skills enough that they are willing to pay even p2 salaries so in the grand scheme of things, how important can this job be to the advancement of singapore?Huh

a country is primary there to serve the interests of its citizens. they dont benefit when people come here to take relatively entry level jobs, this is what the whole mainland backlash is all about. maids and construction workers are unskilled labor, they are invited but cant essentially stay forever or integrate with the population here.
Logged
touchring
Guest
« Reply #12 on: 06 October 2011, 21:02:29 PM »
Reply with quoteQuote

I am just quoting you an example which I came to know from a friend.
A man who was working in a company as a junior analysts (he had just a year experience) is now working in a well known firm as a project manager. Just because the position was open to local.. Lucky guy. But think is it wise and beneficial for the firm in long term??? just be true to yourself


When times are good, all talents are welcomed.  But when times turn for the worst...

The Singapore government is known change policies 180% within a short period of time, if you do not know, a recent example is the development of bio-science which is now being abandoned in favor of the financial sector and casinos.

We have to be realistic.
Logged
sal_909
Guest
« Reply #13 on: 08 October 2011, 16:41:28 PM »
Reply with quoteQuote

Tropics_Oz, the only advice I have is based on a similar situation I encountered back 1997, so it may not be pertinent today. (No harm trying it though.)

I had a prospective employee at the time who, although he had been previously been a Singapore EP holder, had his EP application to work in my organisation rejected. We appealed and it was rejected again. Because this employee would have been a valuable addition to the company (and because I wanted to help him out of a tricky situation) I went down to Immigration with my head of HR and asked very politely to speak somebody about it.

The officer we spoke to was at first rather bureaucratic, saying that they were not obliged to provide an explanation. I explained that I wasn't challenging their decision, but merely seeking clarification - as this potential employee appeared to fulfill all the criteria for an EP holder and, in case we were to apply for an EP for somebody else, I wanted to make sure we hadn't missed anything. This appeared to mollify him and he looked through the original application.

Upon looking at it, he agreed that my the guy we wanted to hire did indeed meet their criteria. He then said he would resubmit the application - and that the following week he would be involved in the committee that reviews these applications, so there shouldn't be a problem! Sure enough, the following week my employee's application was approved.

It really was as arbitrary as that!

So, perhaps you can ask your potential employer to try this.

@Addadude: Thanks for the sharing. I was wondering if an appointment to the MOM could be initiated only through the employer and which MOM department handles the EP appeal process´╝č is it the one by the river walk?
Logged
Addadude
Hero Member
*****
Posts: 431



View Profile WWW
« Reply #14 on: 10 October 2011, 18:46:35 PM »
Reply with quoteQuote

The discussion I mentioned took place at the ICA building next to Lavender MRT. But that was in 1997...

I gather you now have to go to MOM at Havelock Road (yes, near Riverwalk).

Going down by yourself will probably not have much effect. If, on the other hand, your company's HR person was to go down to enquire about the reasons for the rejection "so they would not have to waste time again", you might have better luck and more clarity.
Logged
Pages: [1] 2
  Reply  |  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines